​​​​As a year-end special program, a New York radio station invited listeners to participate in paired on-air conversations. One segment featured an intergenerational exchange; a female twenty-year-old was paired with a septuagenarian (1). When asked what in particular marked their generations, the latter pointed to the Vietnam War as the defining event of his generation, whereas the former summarized and defined her generation in one word—uncertainty.

      Coincidentally, results released the same day from a survey of UK chief financial officers assigned uncertainty to describing the “new normal.” Although optimism in that country is up since the summer Brexit vote, it remains to be seen what Brexit’s impact will be over the long haul (2). Here in the states, uncertainty also hangs in the balance with a new administration. One thing that is certain is that organizations will want to manage change that is transformational.              

      The intergenerational on-air dialogue may very well have contributed a spark to the Women’s March on Washington on January 21, 2017, by harking back to the 1968 protests against the Vietnam war. What began this year as a one-city event for human rights mushroomed into a global phenomenon attracting individuals and organizations committed to equality, diversity, and inclusion and representing the rights and voices of progressive people around the world. The registered tally was 673 “official” sister marches across the United States and around the world on January 21. Moreover, participation far exceeded expectations: at the rally in Trenton NJ, 4000 additional marchers showed up in solidarity with the 2000 registered marchers.

        True to its pledge that the march not be “a sprint, but a marathon” the national organizers posted its initiative the following day: 10 ACTIONS IN 100 DAYS (3).  That is why we see the timing of ODCFW’s website launch at this time as an auspicious rallying point for organization development (OD) professionals to lead momentous change in the business world, as both internal and external consultants by facilitating meaningful collaborations that are transformational.          

      Collaboration, as Syracuse University Professor James Haywood Rolling, Jr., writes, is key to elevated change resulting in enduring human achievements (4).  Who better than OD professionals who have always been proactive in the workplace by inspiring and supporting others to lead the way for sustainable, flourishing workplaces and communities? As women—as well as men and youth—affirmed at the March, we are not going backwards.  Instead, let this be the year that we move toward a more equitable world for the communal enjoyment of the fruits of the world, all of which are for everyone.

(1) WNYC Brian Lehrer Show “Fresh, Non-Politics Conversation Starters for the New Year” December 28, 2016.
http://www.wnyc.org/story/fresh-non-politics-conversation-starters-new-year
(2) “UK firms' finance bosses say uncertainty is 'new normal'”.
http://www.bbc.com/news/business-38453908
(3)
https://www.womensmarch.com/100/
(4) Rolling, J. H., Jr. (2017). The Challenge of Change. Art Education, 70[1], 4-6

​​w January 31, 2017 OD's Role in the Uncertainty Age by Terri McNichol


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